September 25, 2016 · by Sean Heneghan · Cognitive Hypnotherapy

I highly recommend Sean. His clarity of presence and commitment to my wellbeing are in themselves enabling. We are working with childhood traumas which have had major impacts on my life and eventually brought about collapse. Sean’s combination of Eastern and modern Western approaches is contributing to healing and change at a profound level.

In sessions we often move very easily between discussing difficulties and imaginative techniques which access the original experiences underlying them. Every time this has produced new information and understanding and is an important part of building my capacity for healing and change. He is also not afraid to intervene and challenge. And I have discovered that I can challenge him, which is no small thing.

He is himself and doesn’t hide behind his techniques. Through this he models the freedom he talks about, which is very valuable to me.

The acupuncture at the end of sessions brings calming and stabilising and I think it is contributing towards building my strength and resilience, and deep healing and change.

I am grateful to have found him.

 

Anonymous, September 2016

August 1, 2014 · by Sean Heneghan · Uncategorized

A list of small letters after my name might not mean much unless you have an explanation of their significance, so below is a breakdown of my qualifications and the membership bodies I’m connected to. Please feel free to contact me with any questions you might have.

BSc hons, LicAc,

Bsc hons refers to my qualification in Acupuncture which is a 3.5 year degree level training acquired through the College of Integrated Chinese Medicine in Reading. LicAc refers to a Licentiate in Acupuncture which is my license to practice.

MBAcC

MBAcC stands for a member of The British Acupuncture Council which is the main regulatory body for the practice of traditional acupuncture in the UK. Members of The British Acupuncture Council must have had an extensive training to degree level and adhere to specified codes of conduct and safe practice.

HPD

HPD stands for the Hypnotherapy Practitioners Diploma. The HPD is considered by many to be the most rigorous examination for hypnotherapy in the UK and is a requirement to be a member of The National Council for Hypnotherapy.

DipCHyp

DipCHyp is an abbreviation for Diploma in Cognitive Hypnotherapy which I acquired through training at The Quest Institute. Prior to training at Quest, I also acquired a Diploma in Clinical Hypnosis from The Institute of Clinical Hypnosis in London.

MNCH

MNCH is an abbreviation for Member of The National Council for Hypnotherapy (NCH). This governing body is widely acknowledged as one of the most stringent governing bodies for Hypnotherapy in the UK with the requirement of it’s members being they must hold the HPD to be considered for membership. They must also have ongoing supervision and complete a minimum amount of continuing professional development each year.

 

November 17, 2014 · by Sean Heneghan · Acupuncture, Cognitive Hypnotherapy

“I first started seeing Sean for acupuncture treatment in 2010 on the recommendation of a chiropractor who worked at the same clinic as Sean. I needed treatment to help alleviate some debilitating symptoms I was experiencing. As an ‘invisible’ illness it is almost impossible to find a practitioner who can fully understand the varying range and degree of symptoms and how to treat them. I immediately found Sean had a great understanding of the symptoms and his gentle listening approach made it easy for me to explain the severity of the symptoms I was experiencing and how they impacted on my life.

I was already familiar with acupuncture and I was sure it would help but I was totally amazed at the speed at which the symptoms disappeared – even after the first treatment. No more pacing myself in case energy levels plummeted, and the pain lowered to the level that allowed me to get a full night’s sleep.

However, during the course of the acupuncture treatments, various other life events occurred that that had a huge emotional impact on me – car accident, house move, bereavements to name a few! I was starting to feel unable to move forward with my life and generally felt overwhelmed with a huge sense of grief and sadness that would appear as tears and sobbing at any given moment. Not a great way to be when you are trying to work and maintain a professional head on your shoulders!

It was at this time that I began having Cognitive Hypnotherapy with Sean. Initially I was reluctant to try it, I had heard of hypnotherapy and wasn’t sure how it could possibly help. Sean explained to me how Cognitive Hypnotherapy works. When having this deeply relaxing form of therapy you are never asleep, in a trance or at any moment not in complete control and I decided to give it a try.

I am so glad I did – I cannot believe how much it has helped me. It was a revelation. During the sessions the grief and sadness that had been holding me back were gently resolved. However, this was just the start of a journey to full recovery. I didn’t realise how many other areas of my life it would help me with too. As a result I am now more aware of how I react to situations and how to manage those reactions. It has given me new life skills that enable me to live my life in a more positive, forward thinking way. A mind makeover would be a great way to describe it!

Sean is the consummate professional; showing kindness, compassion, and integrity throughout the therapy and I can honestly say, thanks to his expertise I have my life back now.”

Liza Chapman, Buckinghamshire.

August 6, 2014 · by Sean Heneghan · Acupuncture, Cognitive Hypnotherapy

” I wish I had the courage to approach therapy the first time I heard of it from a friend. It took me nearly a year. I was looking at Sean’s site and reading other’s testimonials helped me to make one of the best decisions in years. I wish to share my experience so far if it helps to motivate others, just like it has motivated me, as well as share my thanks to Sean for his care and support. If only I made the call sooner I could have faced my now silly but then huge insecurities, anxieties and worries earlier. Originally all I wanted was help with weight loss – working out my relationship with food and trying to understand why “am I the way I am”…. believing that I was “faulty”.

Being fairly successful and respected in my business career, I still doubted my abilities, and never mind any success or promotions, I still considered myself an underachiever and a failure.The most eye opening thing about acupuncture with Sean was the release of positive energy, and the positive motivation to continue this journey to get back to the happy and confident me that I have left somewhere behind in my teens.

Charged with new levels of energy and curiosity, I began discovering how my mind works, how it has affected my self-belief and self-confidence and I began to see my self through my own eyes, rather than worry about how others must see me or judge me. I laugh now that I look back as I cannot believe how I have created these assumptions in my head, how I felt I had to constantly please everyone in order to be loved or popular. Trust is very important for me and from day one I felt that Sean was not there to judge me, but was there to help me to understand “me”. There is one word that pretty much sums up the process of cognitive hypnotherapy with Sean – purifying . Through talking, and thinking, and a little bit of homework, the overall process of my therapy with Sean has been simply a cleansing of my mind – filtering the things that made me feel bad about myself for no reason that I can understand now when I look back, and enhancing and bringing out the positive that I could not see before.

I used to think that I could face my issues by talking to friends. But they would only comfort me, and not find a solution. It would be only a very short term comfort. The difference in talking to Sean, and working through the layers of feelings, emotions, memories, is not to push them away short term, but to work them out. My previous experience with a therapist involved feeling a lot of pity for myself and somewhat patronised. Not with Sean. I have always felt in good care and confident that he cared, and I have a great respect for his knowledge and experience with people in similar situations. I have been through a fair amount of boxes of tissues before I met Sean. I used to have sleepless nights, I had zero energy, I felt exhausted all the time, I had no creativity or motivation at work. Now I have no problems sleeping, and after the acupuncture I feel I have a lot more energy -  positive energy that has made all the difference for me. It seems that I really only reach for a tissue now when I have a cold. It has been such a great and motivational experience. And it still continues to be.

I can only highly recommend Sean to anyone who doubts their own self. The boost in confidence and energy that I have experienced is, I’m not scared to say, … life changing.”

 

Michaela, Tring

August 6, 2014 · by Sean Heneghan · Cognitive Hypnotherapy
“ I went to Sean as I had a panic attack whilst driving. I thought I was going to die, my life flashed before my eyes (constantly). I had medical tests to confirm there was nothing physically wrong with me and I was shocked. I had moved house and was soon to move again and I was committing to a relationship, everything was perfect! (on  paper!)

I was on holiday and the same panic feeling occurred in a shop. I ended up in the medical centre convinced my blood pressure was sky high and I would have heart issues, everything appeared to be normal and again I was shocked but I couldn’t get over this. My hands were shaking constantly, I couldn’t speak and was scared beyond belief. I called Sean in a state of complete desperation. To be honest he was the first person to come up on my google search but then the only person to return my call. We spoke on the phone initially. I was in a terrible state and he could hear my desperation.

When I first saw Sean he calmed me from being highly tense, emotional and feeling massive physical reactions in myself which I couldn’t understand. Over time he has gradually peeled away layers to show that the present feeling was related to things that were far different from what I initially thought. Over the weeks I have been enlightened. I’ve had a journey of discovery into myself, the world and my relationships. Although I still consider myself a work in progress I am excited about the possibilities I am encountering, and feel excited about my future.

In short Sean has blown my mind. If it wasn’t for his help I would have completely changed my course in life and for this I am deeply grateful. Being so, I am happy to put my name to this testimonial. Whether you have issues or not, if an outlook of negativity in any form can be overcome I feel proud to help and spread my experience”.
Vanessa McCourt, Hertfordshire

September 30, 2013 · by Sean Heneghan · Acupuncture, Research

New research into acupuncture and counselling for depression from Dr Hugh Macpherson at The University of York has led to some interesting conclusions by research scientists on the value of adding acupuncture to the standard care of patients suffering with depression.

The researchers recruited 755 patients who had consulted their doctor about depression within the past 5 years and who fell into the category of having moderate to severe depression.

302 patients were randomized to receive up to 12 weekly sessions of acupuncture plus usual care, another 302 patients received up to 12 weekly sessions of counselling plus usual care, and 151 patients received usual care alone. Both the acupuncture protocol and the counselling protocols allowed for some individualization of treatment. Usual care, including antidepressants, was available according to need and monitored in all three groups.

According to the researchers, compared to usual care alone, there was a significant reduction in the average depression scores at both 3 and 6 months for both the acupuncture and counselling interventions. The difference between the score for acupuncture and counselling was not significant. In addition the researchers noted that at 9 months and 12 months, the scores between all groups evened out so that acupuncture and counselling were no longer significantly better than usual care.

All of this led the researchers to conclude that this was the first study to rigorously evaluate the clinical and economic impact of acupuncture and counselling for patients in primary care, and that their research showed that acupuncture versus usual care and counselling versus usual care are both associated with a significant reduction in symptoms of depression in the short to medium term, without being associated with serious adverse effects.

The research received wide ranging media coverage from The Daily Mail’s article on acupuncture for depression, to Reuter’s coverage of the article here, and the original research piece on PLOS medicine can be found here:

Acupuncture and Counselling for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomised Controlled Trial

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 17, 2013 · by Sean Heneghan · Hypnotherapy, Research

Researchers at the Division of Gastroenterology at the Feinberg School of Medicine  in Chicago have been investigating the impact of hypnosis and hypnotherapy on clinical remission rates over a one year period in patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

Ulcerative Colitis, much like it’s sister condition Crohn’s Disease, is a form of inflammatory bowel disease that is thought to be auto immune in origin – a condition in which the body’s immune system conducts an inflammatory response against its own tissues. The resulting symptoms can be a distressing mix of severe abdominal pain, diarrhoea, bloody stools, weight loss and general malaise.

The researchers in this trial aimed to study the feasibility and acceptability of hypnotherapy and assess the impact of hypnotherapy on clinical remission rates over a one year period in patients with a historical rate of their ulcerative colitis flaring 1.3 times a year.

A total of 54 patients were randomised at a single site to seven sessions of gut-directed hypnotherapy or attention control and followed for 1 year. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants in each condition that had remained clinically asymptomatic (in clinical remission) through 52 weeks after their treatment.

The researchers concluded that after 1 year 68% of the patients that received the gut directed hypnotherapy maintained their clinical remission, versus 40% of the patients in the attention control group. In addition they noted that there were no significant differences between groups over time in quality of life, medication adherence, perceived stress or psychological factors.

The researchers concluded their trial was the first prospective study that demonstrated a significant effect of a psychological intervention on prolonging clinical remission in patients with quiescent ulcerative.

You can read about the full details of the trial here:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apt.12449/abstract

 

September 17, 2013 · by Sean Heneghan · Acupuncture, Research

In this month’s issue of Acupuncture in Medicine, recent research from Brazil into the effect of acupuncture on the symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has led to some interesting results.

The researchers conducted a trial of acupuncture  using a single blind randomised controlled trial. 30 volunteers with PMDD were assigned to either group 1, which received acupuncture, or group 2 which received sham acupuncture. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety and Hamilton Depression scales, and participants received acupuncture twice a week for two menstrual cycles so that each participant received 16 acupuncture treatments in total.

Before the intervention the anxiety and depression scores did not differ between groups. Following the intervention, the researchers reported that symptoms of anxiety and depression were reduced in both groups; but that the improvement was significant in group 1 compared to group 2. There was a mean reduction in anxiety scores of 58.9% in group 1 and 21.2% in group 2. The reduction in the mean depression scores were 52.0% in group 1 and 19.6% in group 2.

You can find full details of the trial here:

Acupuncture for premenstrual anxiety and depression

September 7, 2013 · by Sean Heneghan · Acupuncture, Research

Researchers at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College’s Division of Graduate Education & Research have conducted a systematic review for non-pharmacological interventions for sleep and insomnia during pregnancy.

The researchers conducted an electronic search of multiple online databases from inception up until March 2013. Of 160 articles screened, 7 met the inclusion criteria. 3 trials were prospective randomised controlled trials, one was a prospective longitudinal trial, one experimental pilot study, and two were prospective quasi-randomized trials.

The researchers concluded that exercise, massage, and acupuncture may be associated with improved sleep quality during pregnancy, but that due to the low quality and heterogeneity of the studies yielded, a definitive recommendation could not be made. Further higher quality research was deemed necessary.

You can read full details of the systematic review here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23997252

August 30, 2013 · by Sean Heneghan · Cognitive Hypnotherapy, Hypnotherapy

Phobias are a common source of distress, so common in fact that in the US phobias are the most common form of ‘mental illness’ among women and the second most common in men over the age of 25. Hypnotherapy for phobias is therefore a therapy option that is often sought out, and it’s one that can have profound results in helping people with what can be a disabling problem that severely limits quality of life.

There is a huge range in the phobias in which people can develop, from social phobias connected to anxiety around people or certain social circumstances, and more specific phobias that connected to certain triggers such as lifts, dogs, heights, flying etc. Where a phobia is tied to the pairing of a specific stimulus to a negative emotion during an early formative experience there is a huge range of subjects that can become the source of phobic reactions since the stimulus becomes automatically associated with the emotion in later life. This means people can develop phobic reactions to nearly anything, providing the early sensitizing experience is strong enough. Equally so for some people there may well be no conscious memory or realization of why a given subject has become the source of a phobic reaction.

What is common for many people experiencing a phobia is that they are fully aware their reaction is disproportionate to the actual threat posed, and yet this can have little impact on their experience. This can leave people feeling frustrated, powerless and stuck. That hypnotherapy works with people subconsciously is one of the reasons why it can be such a useful method of therapy for this issue.

acupuncture & hypnotherapy Berkhamsted, Milton Keynes

Anybody who experiences a phobia already knows what it’s like to be hypnotized,  since what they’re currently hypnotized with is all of the negative imaginings, the  terrifying mental rehearsal, and the negative predictions about what would happen in  the future were they were to be in the circumstance that produces their anxiety.  These imaginings in the forms of mental pictures, feelings and sounds we take  completely for granted since they are such a normal part of life but they serve as the  programming that influences our future experience. Hypnotherapy helps with  phobias in a number of different ways, and in a way that it always tailored to each  person, but in part it works by helping you use the same internal machinery of your  imagination in a way that is empowering rather than dis empowering, and helps you  create the kind of experience where you’re calm and comfortable in a circumstance that previously produced fear and anxiety.

When you combine these hypnotic exercises with powerful techniques that can help clear up early sensitizing experiences that are the roots of phobia, then you have the possibility of creating a much more positive kind of future to live into.

My approach is to treat people and their own particular problem as completely unique and as such therapy is fresh for each person in an environment that’s supportive and understanding. If you suffer with a phobia, and are curious about how hypnotherapy could help you, please feel free to get in touch with me on 07717 515 013 or by email at sean@seanheneghan.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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